In the latest chapter of “The Dumbing Down of America,” an American Bar Association panel voted 15-1 to get rid of the requirement for law school applicants to take the Law School Admission s Test (LSAT) and other standardized tests.

Sure, no problem. Law schools don’t need to accept smart people anymore. Who needs a smart attorney anyway?

According to the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), “Both law school and the practice of law revolve around extensive reading of highly varied, dense, argumentative, and expository texts (for example, cases, codes, contracts, briefs, decisions, evidence). This reading must be exacting, distinguishing precisely what is said from what is not said. It involves comparison, analysis, synthesis, and application (for example, of principles and rules). It involves drawing appropriate inferences and applying ideas and arguments to new contexts. Law school reading also requires the ability to grasp unfamiliar subject matter and the ability to penetrate difficult and challenging material.”

Because of this, LSATs have reading comprehension questions to “measure someone’s ability to read, with understanding and insight, examples of lengthy and complex materials similar to those commonly encountered in law school.”

According to LSAC, the LSAT is the most “trusted test in law school admissions and the only test accepted by all ABA-accredited law schools.”

NOT ANYMORE.

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Law schools don’t want smart people. They don’t care. They just want their money – and they want to meet their diversity goals.

Why is this happening? Well, it’s pretty obvious – to me at least. It’s because the Supreme Court might be getting rid of Affirmative Action soon and the leftists have to figure out a new game plan. So this is their answer. Make it easy and let everyone in to law school. And I’m not talking about color and race, I’m talking about brain matter.

But Leo Martinez, ABA council member and dean emeritus at the University of California, is DEFINITELY talking about race. He told everyone what’s going on with getting rid of the LSATs by saying, “In the grand scheme of things, folks of color perform less well on the LSAT than not, and for that reason, I think we are headed in the right direction.”

We also have something else going on with Yale and Harvard law schools no longer participating with the rankings coming out of the U.S. News and World Report because their methodology doesn’t acknowledge the schools’ efforts to recruit and support the poor and working-class students.

Yale Law School Dean Heather Gerken said the rankings are flawed and “disincentivize programs that support public interest careers, champion need-based aid and welcome working-class students into the profession.”

Yes she’s upset that the rankings have too much to do with whether a school is actually a good school or not. Because to her, it’s all about intensions and feelings and if schools are “helping” people not necessarily educating them.

Merit and reality aren’t acceptable metrics anymore.
CRT is everywhere. DEI is everywhere. It’s how things are done now. Is your doctor qualified to do the surgery you need? Who knows.
Is the pilot qualified to fly the plan you are on? Who knows.

Good luck out there, people.

This piece was written by Liberty Paige on November 23, 2022. It originally appeared in SteveGruber.com and is used by permission.

 

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